Do You Remember These Classic 80s Toys?

About this Quiz

If you were a kid during the 1980s, then you’ll know some of the hundreds of toys that came out during that decade. Like every other decade, those of the 1980s are unique, mostly consisting of some eccentric yet simple toys. From multicolored monsters to plush aliens and transforming toys, they seemed to have everything. Some of them are so popular that they’re still being made today.

So how well do you know the toys of the 1980s? Will an image help to jog your memory? There’s only one way to find out, and that is by taking this quiz!

Start Quiz!
Resume Quiz

1. These plush bears were only meant to be featured on greeting cards.

John Trainor / Flickr.com
  1. Yo-yos
  2. Raggedy Ann dolls
  3. Beanie Babies
  4. Care Bears
The Care Bears are a group of bear characters who were introduced on greeting cards in 1981. By 1983, they were turned into plush teddy bears, and in 1985, they made their television debut.
scroll to continue

2. Released in Japan in 1989, this toy was the first handheld console in its family. Remember playing Super Mario Land?

Evan Amos / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Radio Flyer Wagon
  2. Slinky
  3. Game Boy
  4. Army men
The first Game Boy, released in April 1989, was an 8-bit handheld game console manufactured by Nintendo. Games like Super Mario Land and Tetris made is one of the best-selling consoles of all time.
scroll to continue

3. Only the coolest kids on the block owned one of these low-riding tricycles.

John Morgan / Flickr.com
  1. Evel Knievel stunt set
  2. Tiny Tears
  3. Big Wheel tricycle
  4. Mr. Potato Head
A Big Wheel tricycle is a brand of plastic low-riding tricycles which were very popular in the 1970s and the 1980s. The toys were marketed to boys between the ages of eight and ten.
scroll to continue

4. Are puzzles your thing? Get one of these 3D combination cubes that some people never solve.

Acdx / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Rubik’s cube
  2. Pogo stick
  3. Easy-Bake oven
  4. Chatter telephone
A Rubik’s Cube is a 3-dimensional combination puzzle that was created by the Hungarian sculptor, Erno Rubik. As of last year, over 350 million cubes were sold.
scroll to continue

5. Director Michael Bay “transformed” this toy’s cartoon franchise into a series of action films:

Sham Hardy / Shutterstock.com
  1. Transformers
  2. Rock-a-Stack
  3. Creepy Crawlers
  4. Barrel of Monkeys
Transformers are a line of mecha toys that were introduced in Japan and the United States in 1984. It followed two races of aliens which were able to transform from a vehicle to a robot.
scroll to continue

6. Did you know these dolls were originally called “The Little People”? Their name was later changed.

William McKeehan / Flickr.com
  1. Mr. Potato Heads
  2. Cabbage Patch Kids
  3. Bratz
  4. Barbie's Dreamhouse
Cabbage Patch Kids are a line of dolls best known for being one of the biggest toy fads of the 1980s. It spawned a franchise that included animated cartoons, board games, and an album.
scroll to continue

7. Twilight Sparkly, Rainbow Dash, and Pinkie Pie are all characters from this 1980s toy line:

SayaPhotos / Pixabay.com
  1. My Little Pony
  2. Legos
  3. Silly Putty
  4. Matchbox cars
My Little Pony was initially a line of toy ponies featuring colorful bodies and long manes. They were so successful that they have been revamped several times since first introduced in 1982.
scroll to continue

8. If you have these originals in mint condition, you could get up to $10,000.

Richard Lewis / Flickr.com
  1. Hula hoops
  2. Frisbees
  3. Star Wars action figures
  4. Tonka trucks
Star Wars action figures were created in 1977, just a few months after the first movie’s release. It wasn’t until the first trilogy was complete that they really took off, selling over 300 million action figures before 1985.
scroll to continue

9. This video game company is responsible for games like Pong, Street Racer, and Air-Sea Battle.

Evan Amos / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Atari 2600
  2. G.I. Joe
  3. Troll doll
  4. Plarail toy train
The Atari 2600 was a home video game console from Atari, which was released in 1977. It was often bundled with the game Combat and Pac-Man.
scroll to continue

10. Despite being marketed in 1967, these really took off in the 1980s. Maybe it had something to do with the neon craze?

Julee Dyer / Flickr.com
  1. Lite Brite
  2. Stylophone
  3. Trolls
  4. Play Station
Despite being marketed during the late 1960s, it wasn’t until the 1980s, during the neon era, that these illuminating plastic peg toys became a hit.
scroll to continue

11. Made from 1984 to 1989, these little toys were hand-painted to resemble their real-life counterparts.

Gregg O'Connell / Flickr.com
  1. WWF Superstars
  2. American Girl dolls
  3. Mindflex
  4. Tickle Me Elmos
Wrestling Superstars were the first action figures based on the wrestlers of the World Wrestling Federation. After the toys were created, a video game quickly followed.
scroll to continue

12. Did you know that these consist of over 2,000 natural rubber filaments?

Evan Amos / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Weebles
  2. Hot Wheels
  3. Koosh balls
  4. Baby Alive
A Koosh ball is a toy ball composed of thousands of rubber strands radiating from its steel bound core. They were later used to help young tennis players to develop motor skills.
scroll to continue

13. Before becoming a toy, she appeared on greeting cards with the quote, “Life is delicious”...

Softness / Flickr.com
  1. Chatty Cathy
  2. Strawberry Shortcake
  3. SuperBall
  4. Lite Brite
Strawberry Shortcake is another character who started off on greeting cards, before expanding into dolls and other products. The line of toys also includes her friends and pets.
scroll to continue

14. This toy was produced to represent the four branches of the US Military:

Mike Mozart / Flickr.com
  1. Paddington Bear
  2. Playmobil
  3. Nerf ball
  4. G.I. Joe
G.I. Joe is a line of action figures which were created to represent the four branches of the armed forces. Later, a female counterpart, “G.I. Jane” was introduced.
scroll to continue

15. Instead of drawing on your parents' walls, draw on this!

Les Chatfield / Flickr.com
  1. Speak & Spell
  2. My Little Pony
  3. Etch A Sketch
  4. Teddy Ruxpin
Etch A Sketch is a drawing toy that creates works of art by twisting the knobs at the bottom of the screen. In the 1980s, two other versions were released, the Animator and the Animator 2000.
scroll to continue

16. These reptilian toys were brought to life after their success in the comic book industry.

Global Panorama / Flickr.com
  1. Matchbox cars
  2. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle
  3. Atari 2600
  4. Frisbee
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are a group of anthropomorphic turtles who have been trained in ninjutsu. It first started as a comic but later branched out into film, an animated series, and toys.
scroll to continue

17. Despite being launched a few decades before, things really picked up for this toy in the 1980s when it broke into the media industry:

Alex_Fotos / Pixabay.com
  1. Cabbage Patch Kids
  2. Glo worm
  3. Barbie
  4. Shrinky Dinks
Barbie is a fashion doll that was created back in 1959. In its earlier years, it faced significant backlash, including lawsuits for the toy’s originality. In the 1980s, sales picked up, and it is now the most sold doll in the world.
scroll to continue

18. These blue figurines are based on creatures who live in mushroom-shaped houses in the forest. Don’t tell Gargamel!

Capri23auto / Pixabay.com
  1. Care Bears
  2. Pound Puppies
  3. Slap bracelets
  4. Smurfs
The Smurfs is a toy franchise that spawned from a Belgian comic book series, “Les Schtroumpfts noir”. It was centered around a fictional colony of small, blue creatures living in mushroom-shaped houses.
scroll to continue

19. These plastic toys remain sticky no matter how many times you wash them:

Diana Watkins / Flickr.com
  1. Koosh balls
  2. Sticky hands
  3. Wrestling buddies
  4. Transformers
Sticky hands are plastic toys with a long attachment and with a sticky hand on the end. It is well known that it remains sticky no matter how many times they are washed.
scroll to continue

20. Also known as the “Flying Turtle”, this human-powered toy was created by an engineer for his grandson.

Michael Ocampo / Flickr.com
  1. Roller Racer
  2. PEZ dispenser
  3. Gumby
  4. Barbie
A Roller Racer, also known as a Flying Turtle, is a human-powered vehicle toy for children. The toy was invented by an engineer as a gift for his grandson but was manufactured and sold to the masses.
scroll to continue

21. The small-scale toys were made to mimic popular cars and science fiction film characters in the 1980s.

Moxmarco / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Glow sticks
  2. Micro Machines
  3. Skip-Its
  4. Super soakers
Micro Machines are a line of small-scale toys that were famously advertised by John Moschitta Jr., the world’s fastest talker. As of 2016, they were no longer available.
scroll to continue

22. Afraid to go to sleep? Then you probably owned one of these light-up toys.

Ariel Grimm / Flickr.com
  1. Sock Money
  2. Joy Buzzer
  3. View-Master
  4. Glo Worm
Glo Worm is a stuffed toy that would light up when squeezed, giving off a warm glow. The toys were marketed for young kids who were afraid of the dark.
scroll to continue

23. What 80s toy was inspired by the 1960s skipping toy called “Lemon Twist”?

Saskatoon Public Library / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Tamagotchi
  2. Zhu Zhu
  3. Skip-It
  4. Furby
Skip-It is a children’s toy that was affixed to the ankle by a hoop at one end and a plastic ball at the other. The hoop was to be spun in a 360-degree rotation while the person hopped over it with the other leg.
scroll to continue

24. This pocket-sized toy is said to be Barbie’s cousin. Who is she?

Aimee Ray / Flickr.com
  1. Polly Pocket
  2. Chewbacca Star Wars action figure
  3. All the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
  4. Princess Di Beanie Baby
Also created by toy giant Mattel, Polly Pocket is a line of dolls so named because they could fit into any pocket. It is rumored that Polly has a famous cousin: Barbie.
scroll to continue

25. Marketed as non-toxic modeling clay, this variety makes kids feel like hairdressers or barbers.

Doug Waldron / Flickr.com
  1. Lego
  2. Play-Doh
  3. Paper plane
  4. M.A.S.K. toys
Over the years, Play-Doh has had several varieties, including Mop Hair. Kids were allowed to grow, style, and cut hair as they saw fit. It is still sold today but under the name "Buzz ‘n Cut Barber Shop".
scroll to continue

26. This plush toy was named after an extraterrestrial from a 1980s sitcom with the same name.

kimba Howard / Flickr.com
  1. Playmobil
  2. Monopoly
  3. ALF plush
  4. Rubik’s Cube
A.L.F. (alien life form) is the name of an extraterrestrial on a 1980s TV sitcom with the same name. Just a year into the show’s original run, plush toys of the friendly alien were mass-produced.
scroll to continue

27. What was the name of this electronic game that tested your memory?

Wilton Taylor / Flickr.com
  1. Furby
  2. Hot Wheels
  3. Trivial Pursuit
  4. Simon
Simon is an electronic memory game that works by creating a series of tones and lights in a sequence. The user’s job is to try to repeat the sequence before the timer runs out.
scroll to continue

28. This toy is based on one of the most popular cartoons of the 1980s.

CG76 / Flickr.com
  1. Mouse Trap
  2. Transformers
  3. Slinky
  4. He-Man
He-Man is a superhero character from the Masters of the Universe franchise. Along with his friends, he defended the realm of Eternia from Skeletor’s evil forces.
scroll to continue

29. This toy was made for kids wanting a future career in medicine.

Cristiano Betta / Flickr.com
  1. Fisher-Price Medical Kit
  2. Beyblades
  3. Frisbee
  4. Pippa doll
Fisher-Price’s Medical Kit was a toy marketed towards preschoolers to play the role of a doctor. It included a white coat, a stethoscope, a thermometer, and a blood pressure pump.
scroll to continue

30. These plushies were based on a show about a fictional race living on the Isle of Wuz.

Jos Sawyer / Flickr.com
  1. Spirograph
  2. Wuzzles
  3. Pokemon
  4. Connect Four
The Wuzzles are a group of hybrid characters who starred in an animated series with the same name in 1985. Despite only spending a few months on the air, the toys were very popular with kids.
scroll to continue

31. What was this toy robot that could pick up small objects?

Morn / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Frisbee
  2. TOMY Armatron
  3. Fuzzy Felt
  4. Mousetrap
The Armatron is a toy robot made by T.O.M.Y. in 1984. It consisted of a crane-like arm manipulated by two attached joysticks. The toy was very popular for being able to pick up small objects.
scroll to continue

32. This line of stereoscopes featured reels from “The Beverly Hillbillies” and “Sleeping Beauty”.

ThePassenger / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Jenga
  2. View-Master
  3. Super Soaker
  4. Ker-Plunk!
View-Master was a line of special-format stereoscopes with accompanying cardboard disk reels corresponding to color photographs on film.
scroll to continue

33. These stuffed animals were made from parachute material, giving them their characteristic puffy shape.

Jim, the Photographer / Flickr.com
  1. Sindy doll
  2. Hula hoop
  3. Operation
  4. Puffalump
The Puffalumps are stuffed animals created using parachute material. The toys were so successful that they released special editions to commemorate different holidays.
scroll to continue

34. She’s the twin sister of He-Man, and like him, she has her own toy series.

SpeckledOwl / Flickr.com
  1. She-Ra
  2. Beanie Baby
  3. Polly Pocket
  4. Buckaroo
She-Ra is a fictional character who was created in 1985 for the series “She-Ra: Princess of Power”. She turned out to be the long lost twin sister of He-Man, Prince Adam.
scroll to continue

35. Marketed specifically for kids aged 3 and up, these toys sold over 2 billion figures.

Jose Luis Ruiz / Flickr.com
  1. Little People
  2. My Little Pony
  3. Hungry Hungry Hippos
  4. Yahtzee
Little People is a brand of toys for children between the ages of 6 and 36 months. In 1988, several animated series were created, significantly boosting the toys’ sales.
scroll to continue

36. These small plastic toys are one of the priciest Lego-themed toys:

John Bearden / Flickr.com
  1. Girl’s World
  2. Weebles
  3. Crossfire
  4. Space Lego
Space Lego is a Lego-themed set featuring astronauts, spaceships, and extraterrestrial life. It is one of the oldest and most expansive Lego themes ever created.
scroll to continue

37. These collectible dolls’ sales slogan was “every child could have a doll just like them”...

Wrapped in Grey / Wikipedia.org
  1. Simon
  2. My Child Dolls
  3. The Smurfs
  4. Twister
My Child Dolls are a type of toy with felt skin heads and vinyl skin. The dolls were sold in both boy and girl varieties, with four different skin tones.
scroll to continue

38. This boy’s doll is the one rumored to be the inspiration for Chucky, the evil doll from “Child’s Play”.

Kendrick Shackleford / Flickr.com
  1. Slinky
  2. Raggedy Ann
  3. My Buddy
  4. Jacks
My Buddy was a line of dolls meant to make dolls more appealing to little boys. It was also the inspiration for Chucky, the evil doll from the horror film, "Child’s Play".
scroll to continue

39. These animal-shaped toys were great for "keeping" small items inside:

Aimee Ray / Flickr.com
  1. Pictionary
  2. Keypers
  3. Space Hopper
  4. Tamagotchi
Keypers are toys that come in the shape of animals, specifically snails, ladybugs, and turtles. They were so-named because they contained small compartments for children to store small things.
scroll to continue

40. The first of these was described as ice skates with wheels...

Roman Samborskyi / Flickr.com
  1. Light-up shoes
  2. BMX bike
  3. Roller skates
  4. Skateboard
Roller skates are shoes attached to wheels, allowing the wearer to “roll” along. In the 80s, it evolved from just being a past-time to a sport, and at one point it was considered to be made an official Olympic sport.
scroll to continue

41. Wax crayons had been sold from 1885, but when Hallmark took over in 1984, almost every child owned a box of these:

Alissala / Shutterstock.com
  1. Crayola
  2. Jump ropes
  3. Marbles
  4. Pogs
Crayola crayons were first created in 1885, but sales didn't take off until the company was taken over by Hallmark Cards in the 1980s and washable markers were created.
scroll to continue

42. Need some color in your life? This doll from a 1984 series will certainly help.

Ben Becker / Flickr.com
  1. Alphabet blocks
  2. Rainbow Brite
  3. Checkers
  4. Jack-in-the-box
Introduced in 1983 first as a comic, then as a television series character, Rainbow Brite includes a range of dolls and other merchandise which are still manufactured today.
scroll to continue

43. What could you do with a Speak & Spell?

Susan Reynolds / Flickr.com
  1. Learn how to spell
  2. Practice taking selfies
  3. Learn how to sing
  4. Learn how to walk
Speak & Spell is a line of interactive computers used by hundreds of parents to help their children learn how to spell. The company then created a Speak & Read and Speak & Math.
scroll to continue

44. This children’s toy was one of the first animatronics available to consumers.

brina_head / Flickr.com
  1. Teddy Ruxpin
  2. Candy Land
  3. Scrabble
  4. Rocking horse
Teddy Ruxpin is an animatronic stuffed bear toy created by Worlds of Wonder in 1985. The toy’s mouth and eyes would move while reading stories played by an internal cassette tape.
scroll to continue

45. At one point, these collectible plushies sold for $1.99 at Wendy’s.

Bennilover / Flickr.com
  1. Risk
  2. Action Man
  3. Furskins
  4. Plasticene
Furskins were plush toy bears that were created in the 1980s. Unfortunately, the following would never be as large as the inventor's (Xavier Roberts) other creation: Cabbage Patch Kids.
scroll to continue

46. This colorful marsupial was created by a toymaker who worked on Care Bears and Strawberry Shortcake.

Spider.Dog / Flickr.com
  1. American Girl doll
  2. Easy-Bake Oven
  3. Kite
  4. Popples
Popples is a toy and T.V. franchise consisting of brightly-colored marsupial teddy bears with long tails attached to a pom-pom. Each Popple was able to transform into a brightly colored ball.
scroll to continue

47. In a strange twist, these toys spawned their own animated series:

mechnine / Flickr.com
  1. Yahtzee
  2. M.A.S.K.
  3. Wii
  4. Lego
M.A.S.K., which is short for Mobile Armored Strike Kommand, is a media franchise that tells the story of an underground task force and a criminal organization. Action figures were created shortly after the series.
scroll to continue

48. This Japanese stuffed animal made its way to the United States in 1985, becoming an instant hit.

DocChewbacca / Flickr.com
  1. Monchhichi
  2. Stretch Armstrong
  3. Simon
  4. Manga Doodle
First released in Japan in 1974, Monchhichi is a stuffed monkey based on the anime series Monchhichi Twins. It was licensed to Mattel in the U.S. in 1985.
scroll to continue

49. Originally invented in the 40s, this spring toy got a rainbow makeover in the 80s...

N E O 6 i A M / Shutterstock.com
  1. Rainbow Slinky
  2. Silly Putty
  3. Barrel of Snakes
  4. Scratch n' Sniff Stickers
The slinky is a helical spring toy that uses gravity and its own momentum to perform several fun tricks, including traveling down a flight of steps. In the 80s, rainbow colors added to its vibrant appeal!
scroll to continue

50. Kids went on wild adventures with this clay animation star and his sidekick pony...

Wallpaperflare.com
  1. Wallace & Gromit
  2. Shaun the Sheep
  3. Gumby & Pokey
  4. Coraline
Originally invented in 1953 by Art Clokey, Gumby and his trusty pony, Pokey, saw a revival in 1987 when their series returned to television with 99 new, seven-minute episodes.
scroll to continue

51. Beep beep! Only this type of truck could get the heavy duty work done:

Angela kay Agnew / Shutterstock.com
  1. Tonka truck
  2. Barbie's convertible
  3. Matchbox car
  4. Power Wheels jeep
Tonka trucks are a true American classic. They were invented in the 40s in Mound, Minnesota. The name "Tonka" comes from the Dakota Sioux word "tanka", which means great or big.
scroll to continue

52. "Nicole has dysentery" is something you might have read while playing which computer game?

The Pug Father / Flickr.com
  1. Tetris
  2. The Oregon Trail
  3. Math Blaster!
  4. Pac-Man
The Oregon Trail is a computer game first released for Apple II in 1985. Players are tasked with safely transporting their party to the end of the Oregon Trail. Along the way, they need to face fast waters, illnesses, and lots and lots of buffalo.
scroll to continue

53. How many rings could you land on the poles in this bubbly game?

Giggle2000 / Shutterstock.com
  1. Water Ring Toss
  2. Bean Bag Toss
  3. Connect Four
  4. The Game of Life
Popular throughout the 60s, 70s, 80s, and beyond, water ring toss is a simple yet addictive aquarium game that challenges players to launch and land colored rings on poles that are underwater.
scroll to continue

54. What's the name of this frosty treat maker that cooled kids down on hot summer days?

Ian / Flickr.com
  1. Snoopy Sno-Cone Machine
  2. Banana Twin Pops
  3. Fudgsicles
  4. Freeze pops
The Snoopy Sno-Cone Machine made its debut in 1979, landing straight in the hearts (and stomachs) of children across America. The snow cones, which consisted of flavored shaved ice, were made inside Snoopy's doghouse.
scroll to continue

55. Cheese! Fisher-Price produced toy versions of popular household items, including this Fisher-Price...

Thomas Backa / commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Electronic encyclopedia
  2. Camera
  3. Drum set
  4. Telephone
Fisher-Price is an American company that manufactures educational toys for small children. It was one of the first firms to incorporate vibrant and durable plastics in its toys, as seen by its colorful camera pictured here.
scroll to continue

56. What tabletop game challenges players to "eat" as many marbles as possible?

Steve Berry / Flickr.com
  1. Mouse Trap
  2. Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots
  3. Hungry Hungry Hippos
  4. Battleship
Hungry Hungry Hippos was invented by Milton Bradley in 1967 but continued its success far into the 80s. Players try to collect, or "eat", as many marbles as possible by operating levers on the backs of their mechanical hippos.
scroll to continue

57. From a saloon to a sawmill, these toys let kids build their own Wild West towns:

dollyhaul / Flickr.com
  1. Barbie's Dreamhouse
  2. Duplos
  3. Lincoln Logs
  4. Pick Up Sticks
Lincoln Logs are the work of John Lloyd Wright, the son of famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The small, notched logs are analogous to the real logs used to construct log cabins, enabling children to easily assemble their own rustic-looking structures.
scroll to continue

58. In which video game does an elf named Link rescue the title princess character?

Christopher Bauer / Flickr.com
  1. The Legend of Zelda
  2. Fortnite
  3. Minecraft
  4. Pong
Game & Watch is a handheld electronic game introduced by Nintendo from 1980 to 1991. Some of its best selling games included The Legend of Zelda.
scroll to continue

59. What handheld electronic game shares its name with a famous wizard?

Junkyardsparkle / commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Harmonica
  2. Merlin
  3. Space Invaders
  4. Atari 2600
MERLIN THE ELECTRONIC WIZARD is a handheld electronic game invented by a former NASA employee and produced by Parker Brothers in 1978. It sold over 5 million units during its initial run, making it one of the most popular early handheld games.
scroll to continue

60. This "little" house was one of many collectible homes of the 1980s:

luckylili33 / Pixabay.com
  1. Cabbage Patch Kids
  2. Clackers
  3. Little People family home
  4. Holly Hobbie
The (Little People) family home is one of many toy houses that accompanied several toys in the 1980s. Later on, a family barn was also introduced.
scroll to continue

Just a sec, we're calculating your result!