You'll Only Ace This Quiz If You're Over 40

About this Quiz

Hey Millennials! There are some things that younger generations just don't get. Like the things, people, and fashions you'll find on this quiz. In a time where there seem to be new tech advances every week, it's easy to forget the good old days, when things went just a little bit slower. Did you every ride a banana bike? What was your favorite Cracker Jack prize?

Are you up for the challenge? If you're not a real baby boomer, there is no way you'll be able to identify these things. If you are... get ready for one big trip down memory lane!

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1. Grandma gave Tommy one of these for his birthday:

Kevin Tichenor / Shutterstock.com
  1. Life lesson
  2. Motorized bicycle
  3. Unicycle
  4. Banana Bike
A banana bike, sometimes called a wheelie bike, is a stylized bicycle that was designed in the 1960s to resemble the popular 1950s chopper motorcycle. It is characterized by its banana-shaped seat, sister bar, and ape hanger controls.
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2. Did you watch her marry Charles, Prince of Wales?

John Mathew Smith / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Catherine of Aragon
  2. Amelia Earhart
  3. Eleanor Roosevelt
  4. Princess Diana
Diana, Princess of Wales (1961 – 1997), was the first wife of Charles, Princess of Wales. She is also the mother of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex.
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3. Want attention? Try driving this iconic muscle car, named after a horse:

ermess / Shutterstock.com
  1. Chevrolet Bison
  2. Ford Mustang
  3. Plymouth Barracuda
  4. Mercury Cougar
When the Ford Mustang debuted in 1964, it was only sold for $2,368. These days, a new Mustang is worth almost $27,000!
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4. What could you buy from Betty?

Everett Collection / Shutterstock.com
  1. Cigarettes
  2. Diamond rings
  3. Poetry
  4. Kisses on the cheek
From the 1920s - 1950s, there was no need to take a trip to the nearest corner store or kiosk when you needed a cigarette. At clubs, restaurants, bars, airports, casinos, theaters, and sporting events, cigarette girls had you covered.
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5. Where could you buy this tasty snack food?

Keith Homan / Shutterstock.com
  1. A baseball game
  2. Only in Tijuana
  3. A formal ball
  4. A five-star restaurant
This tasty caramel-coated popcorn got its name when a random sampler of the snack said, “That’s a crackerjack!” In 1896, this was slang for "so good". Just imagine if someone named their snack food “Dope” today!
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6. What's Berta doing?

Nijs, Jac de / Anefo / commons.wikimedia.com
  1. Starring in a sci-fi t.v. show
  2. Meditating
  3. Drying her hair
  4. Getting a brain implant
The first hair dryer was invented in 1890 by French stylist Alexander Godefroy, and it has evolved significantly since. Bonnet dryers were introduced in the 1950s, and by the 1960s, many people had one of these devices in their homes. Unfortunately, the higher wattage resulted in several deaths.
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7. As well as clothes, women used this to iron their:

Carlos Yudica / Shutterstock.com
  1. Hair
  2. Fingernails
  3. Eyelashes
  4. Stomachs
Before the flat iron was invented, some women resorted to dangerous methods to achieve the bone straight look. While a person lays their head on an ironing board, a friend would iron out sections of their hair.
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8. Call your friend to gossip about the latest episode of:

CBS Television / Shutterstock.com
  1. The Desperate Housewives
  2. The Real Housewives of New York
  3. Buffy The Vampire Slayer
  4. I Love Lucy
Airing for six seasons, I Love Lucy is still regarded as one of the greatest of all time. It continues to be referenced in pop culture, even today.
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9. If your parents don't let you get a dog, ask for this:

Melissa King / Shutterstock.com
  1. Baby rats
  2. Ant farm
  3. Sympathy
  4. Beehive
An ant farm, also called a formicarium, is an enclosed area that was designed to study ant colonies and their behavior. They were invented by French entomologist Charles Janet and became extremely popular when Uncle Milton’s Toys sold them in the 1960s.
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10. “Life is what happens when you're busy making _____.” – John Lennon

Emka74/Shutterstock
  1. Cake
  2. Goals
  3. Plans
  4. Food
“Life is what happens when you're busy making plans,” was said by the English singer and guitarist of the Beatles, John Lennon. He was very well known for his political and peace activism.
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11. You're looking at Alcatraz, which is:

Pfnatic / commons.wikimedia.org
  1. A slaughterhouse
  2. A Hollywood movie set
  3. A bank
  4. An inescapable prison
Nearly inescapable! One June night in 1962, prisoners Frank Morris, along with brothers Clarence and John Anglin, managed to escape Alcatraz using dummy heads to fool the guards. They left the island on a makeshift raft.
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12. You were a "Psycho" if you hadn't seen a suspense movie by:

Trailer screenshot / commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Babe Ruth
  2. Bill Gates
  3. George Bush
  4. Alfred Hitchcock
He was a master of suspense! Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho," although released more than sixty years ago, is still considered to be one of the best films of all time.
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13. If you cranked this crank long enough:

Alexandru Nika / Shutterstock.com
  1. The car's window would open
  2. You'd get ice cream
  3. Your car would start
  4. The jack would come out of the box
Yes, you actually had to roll up and down your windows with your hands. It took strength and coordination. Now, of course, you can press a button.
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14. Sally can't go to school without her:

Shelagh Duffett / Shutterstock.com
  1. Chukka boots
  2. Charlotte Louises
  3. Magic slippers
  4. Mary Janes
How did Mary Janes get their unforgettable names? Mary Jane and Buster Brown were characters in the comic strip "Buster Brown", first published in 1902. Mary Jane was actually named and drawn after the artist's daughter.
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15. Did you want to copy this First Lady's style?

John F. Kennedy Library / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Martha Washington
  2. Michelle Obama
  3. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis
  4. Edie Sedgwick
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (1929 – 1994) was the wife of President John F. Kennedy and the First Lady of the United States. Throughout her career, she was also known as an international style icon.
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16. Use this to:

Dave Winer / Flickr.com
  1. Do math
  2. Communicate with the spirits
  3. Hit your brother over the head
  4. Reach enlightenment
The Ouija board, also known as a spirit board, is a flat board that is believed to be used to communicate with the spirits. It is marked with the letters of the alphabet, the numbers 0-9, the words “yes” and “no,” and occasionally “hello” and “goodbye.”
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17. Tod's wearing a white cap and apron, because he is a:

Everett Collection / shutterstock.com
  1. Soda Jerk
  2. Businessman
  3. Clown
  4. Impersonator
Between the 1940s - 1960s, being a "soda jerk" was a popular profession. Dressed as doctors in white coats, thousands and thousands of these glorified bartenders dished out artisanal ice cream and bubbly beverages to eager teenagers on dates.
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18. Use this scale to weigh your:

AKaiser / Sutterstock.com
  1. Jewelry
  2. Gold
  3. Worries
  4. Food
Back in the day, food scales either came in spring models or balance scales.
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19. An cheerful Mouse and a flying squirrel made history in:

Bullwinkle Studios / imbd.com
  1. The Huckleberry Hound Show
  2. The Woody Woodpecker Show
  3. The Bullwinkle Show
  4. Ivor the Engine
The Bullwinkle Show (and its companion, Rocky and His Friends) are responsible for creating one of the most-adored cartoon-duos in the history of the universe. Both shows are set in Frostbite Falls, Minnesota, which mysteriously undergoes some serious in and out migrations. Sometimes its population is given as 23, sometimes as 48, sometimes as 29, sometimes as 31.5 and, then, astonishingly as 4,001.
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20. Dora is:

jakkapan / shutterstock.com
  1. Putting coordinates into her GPS
  2. Storing extra cash
  3. Turning up the heat
  4. Jamming out to her favorite tracks
The 8-track tape is a magnetic tape (sound) recording which became popular from the mid-1960s up until the early 1980s, before being replaced by the compact cassette. The 8-track tape had a standard length of 80 minutes, doubling the play time.
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21. “And so, my fellow _____: ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” – J.F. Kennedy

Cecil Stoughton/ Wikimedia Commons
  1. Banana
  2. American
  3. Russian
  4. Nuthead
“And so, my fellow American: ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country,” was said by president John F. Kennedy. It was said during his inaugural address to remind people of the importance of their civic duty.
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22. They bought it for little Jimmy, but dad's the only one that uses it:

Tap10 / Shutterstock.com
  1. A flying saucer
  2. A jump rope
  3. Happy juice
  4. A pogo stick
The original pogo stick is a thing of the past; they've been adapted for more extreme jumping and flipping in a sport now known as Xpogo.
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23. Tod is using a:

pellethepoet / flickr.com
  1. Cash register
  2. Video game
  3. A divination device
  4. Typewriter
By the 1950s, educators believed that the use of a typewriter in the classroom would stimulate children's interest in spelling, writing, and reading, and reduce behavioural problems. Of course, unlike laptops today, typewriters had no internet or gaming capabilities.
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24. Bon Appetit! Eat this:

Joe Belanger / Shutterstock.com
  1. For Christmas dinner
  2. In front of a T.V.
  3. Only in case of the apocalypse
  4. For breakfast
It's a T.V. dinner! Swanson was the first company to achieve significant success in selling these frozen microwavable meals. Their contents varied and included anything from turkey and cornbread to fried chicken or spaghetti.
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25. Evelyn makes her living as a:

Everett Collection / Shutterstock.com
  1. Astrophysicist
  2. Spy
  3. Switchboard operator
  4. Math teacher
Once upon a time, you couldn't make a telephone call without a switchboard operator! Before proper privacy regulations were put in place, operators like Eva could listen in to the calls they connected. Imagine all the juicy gossip...
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26. What's the secret to macrame?

pornpawit / Shutterstock.com
  1. Knotting
  2. Sewing
  3. Knitting
  4. Praying
Rather than weaving and knitting, macrame is created by knotting. It is said to have been invented by Babylonians.
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27. This Hollywood star lived a real-life fairy tale when she became Princess of Monaco:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Cher
  2. Grace Kelly
  3. Britney Spears
  4. Janis Joplin
Grace Kelly (1929 – 1982) was an American actress who starred in several critically acclaimed films throughout the 1950s. In 1956, she became the Princess of Monaco after marrying Prince Rainier III.
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28. What would a grocery store clerk store in this?

Ron Zmiri / Shutterstock.com
  1. Penny candy
  2. Falsified passports
  3. Goldfish
  4. Cash
In 1879, James Ritty invented the very first cash register -- not to manage customer's money. Why then? To prevent employees from pocketing the profits.
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29. Rock, swing, and turn all night long, dancing the:

Everett Collection / Shutterstock.com
  1. The Snake
  2. The Jitterbug
  3. The Wop
  4. The Sprinkler
The popularity of this dance spread when American soldiers brought it to Great Britain; there were even jitterbug competitions held as far as Australia.
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30. No autumn festival is complete without these:

Anna Om / Shutterstock.com
  1. Roasted pumpkins
  2. Apples and Tobasco sauce
  3. Surprise eggs
  4. Honey baked apples
Honey-baked apples are an old-fashioned favorite in which cored apples are drizzled with a brown sugar and honey mixture and baked for about 40 minutes.
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31. What would you put in this to complete your perfect breakfast spread?

netopaek / Shutterstock.com
  1. Bread
  2. Eggs
  3. Orange juice
  4. Flowers
Toasters have been a part of breakfast since 1921. Since then, we've adapted toasters to also toast waffles, crumpets, and even hot dogs!
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32. Want to be a 1950s airline stewardess? You had to be:

Masson / shutterstock.com
  1. Single
  2. Descended from British royalty
  3. At least 7 feet tall
  4. Fluent in 20 languages
Back in the 1950s, flights used to be OUTRAGEOUSLY expensive. Many people spent an entire month's salary to afford a trip on a passenger jet. Of course, passengers road in style and airline stewardesses (who had to be single) served meals on real china plates.
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33. Use this tool to open:

WikimediaImages / pixabay.com
  1. Cans
  2. Time portals
  3. Windows
  4. Eyes
A spool is a cylindrical device on which thread can be wound. The higher the number on the spool, the finer the thread. Keep in mind that numbering systems aren't the same across all threads. They depend on the manufacturer!
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34. “You can dance, you can jive, having the time of your life, ooh see that girl, watch that scene”... is:

Vytautas Kielaitis / Shutterstock.com
  1. Hanson
  2. Bob Dylan
  3. Craig David
  4. ABBA
If you never listened to ABBA, you've missed out on life. The Swedish band became a sensation during the mid-70s and 80s, after winning Eurovision in 1974.
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35. Don't worry! In case of the apocalypse, Daddy's built a:

Liftarn / Shutterstock.com
  1. Time machine
  2. Fallout Shelter
  3. Space ship
  4. Bar
A fallout shelter is an enclosed area specifically designed to protect people from radioactive debris or fallout from nuclear explosions. The trend started to emerge during the height of the Cold War (1962 – 1979).
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36. Prepare for an evening out by spritzing on her signature #5 scent:

Marion Pike / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. Coconut Channelle
  2. Cocoa Cinnamon
  3. Coockoo Chanel
  4. Coco Chanel
Coco Chanel, whose real name is Gabrielle Bonheur (1883 – 1971) was a French fashion designer who founded the luxury brand, Chanel. She was credited with freeing women from the restricting corseted silhouette.
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37. Use this to:

Evan-Amos / Wikipedia.org
  1. Listen to music
  2. Place sports bets
  3. Travel back in time
  4. Make a home video
A portable cassette player is a personal mobile device that allows its user to listen to recorded audio files while mobile. Most players are listened to with earphones, but there are also some which have small loudspeakers.
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38. Trying to lose some weight? Take a sip of Tab:

Drown Soda / commons.wikimedia.org
  1. A cold medicine
  2. A milkshake
  3. A sleeping pill
  4. A diet soda
Tab was a diet cola soft drink that reigned supreme until the introduction of Diet Coke in 1982.
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39. Read this book to find:

nito / Shutterstock.com
  1. Your crush's phone number
  2. All the answers
  3. Where Barbosa buried his treasure
  4. The latest gossip in the town
Want to call Bill Smith? Good luck with that. Your phone book was sure to have at least 100 of those listed.
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40. Patty kept her date waiting while putting on this eye-beauty trend:

sarahcstanley / Flickr.com
  1. Magic eyes
  2. False Bottom Lashes
  3. Glitter
  4. Eyeliner tattoos
One of the biggest beauty trends to come out of the 1960s was bottom lashes. The look, which was made famous by model Twiggy, was achieved by either adding false lashes to the bottom eyelid or by using mascara to create an illusion.
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41. When you turn this on, your blanket:

Your Best Digs / Flickr.com
  1. Vibrates
  2. Monitors your brain waves
  3. Cools down
  4. Heats up
An electric blanket is a type of blanket that integrates electrical heating wires to keep individuals or surfaces warm. Prior to 2001, many blankets did not have a shut-off mechanism, and many users ran the risk of overheating. There was also a concern that they could increase the chances of developing cancer.
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42. Use these tubes to store:

jarrad / Shutterstock.com
  1. Nails
  2. Cookies
  3. Raindrops
  4. Camera film
Before digital cameras, you had to develop photos using film. These tubes protected your photos by making sure that film wasn't exposed to the light before it was developed.
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43. Up, up, and away! Which space station, was launched in 1973?

NASA / Shutterstock.com
  1. Atlantis, The Lost City
  2. Dr. Dolittle
  3. Wonderland
  4. Skylab
Skylab only spent six years orbiting space. It re-entered the atmosphere after that with debris scattering to parts of Australia and the Indian Ocean.
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44. For her date, Susie bought herself a new pair of:

New Africa / Shutterstock.com
  1. Sneakers
  2. Little whales
  3. Platform shoes
  4. Kitten heels
Kitten heels are the shorter forms of stilettos and are usually between one and two inches tall.
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45. These were:

billybruce2000 / Shutterstock.com
  1. Fire extinguishers
  2. Useless
  3. Drive-in movie speakers
  4. Extraterrestrial life detectors
You're looking at drive-in movie theater speakers. Those were the days! Customers used to be able to bring their baby to watch the movie with them, and order cocktails from roller-skating waitresses!
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46. Developing film from your last trip to the beach? Take it to:

Britta Gustafson / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. The post office
  2. Your great uncle Sal
  3. The dollar store
  4. A fotomat booth
Fotomats were most popular for developing film overnight. By the 1980s, there were over 4,000 booths throughout the United States.
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47. To get ready for school, pack Martha's __________ in this:

Hurst Photo / shutterstock.com
  1. Electrical cables
  2. Homework
  3. Lunch
  4. Diamonds
Back in the 1800s, miners and construction workers used metal tins to protect their lunches from debris. Children, who wanted to copy their parents, began taking their lunches to school in metal tins, too. Volia, the lunch box! Of course, it wasn't until the 50s, when lunchboxes started boasting kids' favorite T.V. shows, that they really became a thing
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48. Your wardrobe wasn't complete without:

Aleutie / Shutterstock.com
  1. Puddle skirt
  2. Pandemonium
  3. Poodle skirt
  4. Peter Pan skirt
Although classic poodle skirts had poodles on them, later versions had hot rod cars, flowers and even other kinds of animals.
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49. Turn the volume up on your favorite cartoons using this:

Gazebo / Commons.wikimedia.org
  1. T.V. remote
  2. Magic 8 Ball
  3. A drone
  4. An electric massager
The first TV remote was known as “Lazy Bones” and was connected to the TV by a wire.
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50. Where would you most likely find this?

Coyau / commons.wikimedia.org
  1. An airplane
  2. A classroom
  3. A horse stable
  4. A playground
Remember, before tablets and laptops, when pencils were all the rage? Crank pencil sharpeners were the answer to all of the classroom's most pressing questions.
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